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Old Shelford Hall

These are photos of a model of Shelford Old Hall in Little Shelford  which is now the property of the Museum of Cambridge. The hall itself was built in 1640 and largely demolished in 1852. 

Part of the north wing remains, now known as the Lodge, which can be found at the junction of Whittlesford Road and Bridge Lane in Little Shelford. It is now a family home.
 
Old Shelford Hall was a Tudor development of a medieval hallhouse, modernised in the Georgian style by Thomas Wale on his return from Riga in the 1760s.

The model Colonel Wale made in the late 1840s shows U-shaped ranges enclosing an open courtyard

A sketch re-produced in Fanny Wale's book gives an idea of the rambling and unpretentious charm of the buildings. 

With its six staircases, beamed and oak-panelled rooms and enormous Elizabethan fireplaces it seems to have been a commodious and comfortable house, lived in and loved by generations of the Wale family. It was however not grand, and was in a poor state of repair when it was partially demolished in the 1850s.

By 1850 the new Hall was arising in the Park and a few years later most of the old house was demolished, only a rump surviving on Bridge Lane to serve as an entrance Lodge.


The Lodge - all that remains today of Shelford Old Hall from a similar perspective.
 

 
 
The Lodge - all that remains today of Shelford Old Hall from
 a similar perspective. (the left hand chimney stack is now
broken on the model)
  

The Lodge - all that remains today of Shelford Old Hall from
 a similar perspective. (the left hand chimney stack is now 
broken on the model)
 

  
 
  
  
 
 
 Photos courtesy of the Museum of Cambridge
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