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Arthur Dunn obituary

OBITUARY for Arthur Dunn from The Times Feb 24 1902

 

 

The death occurred very suddenly on February 20, at Ludgrove, New Barnet, of Mr Arthur T. B. Dunn, the famous Cambridge Association Football "Blue" and international player.   He had been referee only a few days before in a match played between a team organized by himself and Oxford University.   Mr. Dunn, who was 41 years of age, was educated at Eton, where his pace and skill soon won him a high reputation on the football field.   From Eton Mr. Dunn passed to Cambridge, where, in the early eighties he won his "Blue" as a forward and a name among amateur football players which has, perhaps, been equaled only by that of Mr. G. O. Smith in later years.   He played for the Old Etonians in their victorious days, and he was in their side, 20 years ago, when at the Oval they were beaten by Blackburn Olympic and the English Cup was first lost to the South.   As an international Mr. Dunn played both forward and back, forward in his earlier matches and full back in 1892, when he was selected to play against the Scottish eleven.   Mr. Dunn had a large preparatory school at Ludgrove.

 

 DUNN - On the 20th inst., at Ludgrove, New Barnet, very suddenly, Arthur T. B. Dunn, Aged 41.   Funeral on Tuesday 25th inst., at Little Shelford Church, near Cambridge, at 1:30 (Stations, Harston or Shelford).   a Memorial Service will be held at Trent Church, near Barnet, at same hour.  

 

The Times February 25 1902

DUNN - On the 20th inst., at Ludgrove, New Barnet, very suddenly, Arthur T. B. Dunn, Aged 41.   Funeral to-day (Tuesday) 25th inst., at Little Shelford Church, near Cambridge, at 1:30 (Stations, Harston or Shelford).   a Memorial Service will be held at Trent Church, near Barnet, at same hour.   11:10 a.m. Cambridge Express will stop specially at Harston.

 

The Times March 1 1902

 

 A correspondent adds the following appreciation to what we said on Monday about the late Mr. Arthur T. B. Dunn, who died on February 18:
  The athletic world has been quick to appreciate the loss which it has sustained in the death of Arthur Dunn, but it would be an injustice to his memory if he were to pass away without some public testimony to the more serious side of a remarkable character.   His pluck and skill had earned him a foremost place in more than one branch of sport, but it was a special combination of qualities which rendered him a leader not only in games, but among an unusually large circle of friends in every rank of life.   If those who are most in touch with the Eton world, and most jealous of her prestige, had been asked a week ago to name a half a dozen of those old Etonians who best represented the traditions of the school, it is safe to conjecture that Arthur Dunn's name would be found on every such list.   After a short time spent at Elstree as an assistant master, he founded the school at Ludgrove, which now ranks among the best and most popular of it's class.   Ten years ago he commenced with one boy; at the time of his death his list of vacancies was full to overflowing up to the year 1911.

This of itself is a remarkable testimony to his abilities - as regards his character it would perhaps be impossible to describe it more definitely and concisely than by quoting his chosen motto which hung in his room - "Whatsoever thy hand findeth to do, do it with thy might."   With him duty, and the attainment of the best possible results, whether in work or play, was always the paramount consideration.   To a wonderful gift for organizing and clear business capacity he added indomitable energy and a remarkable brightness and sympathy of manner which constituted him a leader in all the many and varied societies to which he belonged.   These qualities won for him the unbounded confidence of the parents of all his pupils; to the boys themselves he was rather a friend than a master, and his assistant masters regarded him as a brother.   But apart from his schoolwork, he was sought out as an advisor and guide by all sorts and conditions of men and boys.   Many is the charitable institution and club which will sorely miss his active participation.   Among those are the Eton Mission and all the societies connected with the old school of which he was a devoted son.   It would be difficult to find another man of his age and position whose premature loss has been more widely and genuinely mourned then that of Arthur Dunn.

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